seeing systems

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a network of jasmine climbs up the fence across the system of trees, forging new paths

“Sorry, what was that? I didn’t quite catch it, I think my wifi is dying or something…”

I lean in closer to my computer screen as if it will help hear better. We’re in the midst of discussion in my speculative design class. Seven of us are seated in our respective homes, crowded around our laptops with our notebooks out on the side, sketching out thoughts as we bounce critiques back and forth about our ongoing projects. We’ve been tasked to model our class in the past, present, and future.

Models have been ever-present and incredibly important to build an understanding around current events. Through examining data, scientists can visualize patterns and project possible futures, providing insight for actions and provoking further questions. Continue reading

Learning to ask the “right” questions

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a quick audiobook-inspired sketch from last week

Six forty-five in the morning. Light has barely touched the sky, and I’m sitting in AP biology class surrounded by my half-asleep friends as we shuffle through our immense binders for fresh note paper. Our teacher mills around the front of the classroom prepping slides, video links, and in-class demos to fill our tenth-grade brains with exciting new knowledge (massive shoutout, she was/is the best).

During those high school biology days, I clung to the goal of having all the right answers at the drop of a question (yeah, yeah, I was another wannabe Hermione Granger, so what?). My favorite part of the class was when our teacher would ask us about connections– what other parts of the body may this impact? What other portions of the ecosystem are interwoven here? How may genes influence entire populations of animals? Before this class, I hadn’t considered any of these questions and more.  Continue reading

science, storytelling, & student orgs

This month has me questioning whether I like sharing stories because I like sharing stories, or I like sharing stories because I like to like sharing stories. (There are a lot of “likes” in that sentence, but the extra one holds importance– much like how when my cognitive science professor talks about intersubjectivity, he describes it as “I know that you know that I know you know,” with that last bit being imperative to defining the mutually-understood shared understanding.) Cogsci lectures aside, the time commitments I’ve sustained this quarter have definitely put me under some pressure in considering whether I make choices based on obligation or passion. Continue reading

twenty

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Aquarium of the Pacific, January 2020

A short note to make sure I don’t already break the goal of semi-regular writing in the first month of the year.

I told myself I would write at least one blog post every month, so here we are. I tried writing something on my actual birthday as I was sitting in my parked car at the beach, breakfast burrito in hand, but let me tell you– it’s a little difficult to type while one hand is occupied holding approximately a pound of eggs, potatoes, and cheese. Continue reading

documenting 2019

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I recently had my sixth grade computer’s contents transferred to an external hard drive and went down a rabbit hole of thoughts from my younger self that didn’t quite make it to this blog. It definitely helped me remember what brought me to where I am now; for every blog post also existed multiple sketches, half-finished song files, and pages of short stories that I drafted just for the sake of drafting.  Continue reading

reflections as a student of science communication

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Why choose a to tell one story over another? Sometimes it’s interest, sometimes it’s inspiration, and other times it’s intrusion. I am relatively new to the rising wave emphasizing science communication, but here are a few of my current thoughts dumped into text so I can (hopefully) continue to process them as I learn more. Continue reading

six years

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My laptop’s spacebar has become a little sticky to the point where occasionally I have to pull out my school ID card, stick the edge under the key, and wiggle it up and down to bring it back to life. I’ve had this computer almost as long as I’ve had this blog, and despite a few hiccups now and then, it’s still running strong (knock on wood). Continue reading