Tagged: science

Lessons from a stranded bus and late night microscope work

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Back in November, the week of Thanksgiving break (actually, the night before Thanksgiving day), I found myself stranded at 12:35am with fifty other people and steady rain in a parking lot in downtown Los Angeles. Usually, I fly back to the Bay Area from my school in San Diego– if I book my tickets sufficiently in advance, the costs are worth the visit back home; however, this time, I didn’t book my flight tickets early enough. Seat availability plummeted, prices skyrocketed, and I decided that taking the budget-friendly bus would be a good alternative.

I didn’t sleep more than an hour that night. We ended up left in that parking lot for reasons I’m to this day unsure of– the bus driver had stopped, told us all to vacate the bus because we were supposed to transfer, and promptly drove off as soon as the last person had removed their bag from the under-bus storage. Needless to say, there was no transfer.

We were in that parking lot for about an hour and a half until the company sent a replacement bus to pick us up. I tried to doze off again on this bus, but the frigid air blowing through the vents kept my mind active even though my body was craving rest. We made it to San Francisco by seven thirty in the morning, and I reached my home by eight. Continue reading

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On Science Education and Stinky Plants

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I waited in line for twenty minutes. At this point, the long string of people almost wrapped around the corner of the building. When I finally walk into the Conservatory of Flowers in San Francisco, a blast of humid air envelops me, closely followed by a musty, almost foul smell. I feel a grin stretching across my face as I trace the scent through a tropical plant oasis into the large gallery that holds the perpetrator.

A titan arum plant, popularly known as the “corpse flower” for its stench, awaits in its terra cotta planter home. A long, yellow protrusion–the spadix–rises from the center of an open, frilly base. The spathe, I remind myself, studying the maroon and green folds of the leaf structure before I tune in to a staff member talking to a mass of wide-eyed visitors.

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Ed Sheeran meets prehistoric flying reptiles

This Week’s Episode: The Universe Holds the Key to People

It all started with a biology project.

For the AP Bio course I’m taking this upcoming school year, there’s a lot of summer homework. There were two projects in total on the list- both concerning our natural environment and organisms inhabiting them. I have until August 5th (Tuesday) to finish both of them, along with a bunch of reading and study guides. I’d like to say that I got a super early head start on all this homework, but… I didn’t. Oops.

The instructions for the project I was working on today were quite simple, in some sense: I was to go out and photograph organisms from certain domains, kingdoms, and phyla (my teacher gave us a list of eighteen different categories). I managed to find most of what I needed around our house and at a nearby park, but then there was the matter of marine creatures- sea stars, jellyfish, you get the idea.

At first I was panicking; how in the world was I supposed to find all of the things I needed in such a short time? But living near San Francisco does have its perks.

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This Week’s Episode: My brain is full of science and oil painting

Good evening, my lovely nerdlings!

Do you ever have days where you feel sluggish and tired and unmotivated to do anything besides binge-watching episodes of Supernatural?

I do indeed have those days.

But this week did not consist of those days.

Yes, I am aware that I have been absolutely, positively terrible about posting lately, but I promise that I do indeed have good reason.

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This Week’s Episode: Crime Scenes and Crazy Writing

Hola, citizens of the interwebs.

It’s been kind of a ridiculous week. But the good kind of ridiculous.

In my science class we’re doing this big super-important biotech unit thing, and being the nerd I am, this is pretty much how I’ve been the entire time:

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