Tagged: thoughts

sophomore year reflections ft. a semi-empty apartment & bag of grapes

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I bask in the silence of my freshly packed-up, on-campus apartment as I crunch through a $1 bag of purple grapes. I’m sitting on the floor, leaning against the closet my roommate and I shared. The closet is completely empty now, an odd sight considering the volcanoes of clothing and empty shopping bags she and I both hid behind the cream-colored double-doors.

I was the first to settle into our room back at the start of this year. Among a spontaneity-embedded weekend of taking the train between San Diego and LA, I started sorting my belongings into new homes: a haphazardly-made bed, empty hangers waiting for clothes, books on desk shelves closely following. My new roommate hadn’t moved in yet. As I sit here now, my lovely roommate has just finished moving out (big shoutout, she’s the best), my books are safely stowed away, and my bed remains half-intact for the final night of this school year. Continue reading

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post-production–good morning, it’s just past midnight

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Spring quarter often brings long days and late nights holed up with leftovers and hot water in homes outside home, at the tip of a mundane hill.

Many nights–ones that contain spending upwards of seven hours in a glorified closet on the farthest outskirts of campus–send me clattering down the hill on a rental bike in avoidance of a midnight walk under broken street lamps, fluorescent metal frame creaking on cement and cobblestone. The new building’s lights are still on, flooding the walkway’s outlined squares with butter yellow. Whisk past wooden structures–student center, bookstore, branches squealing in protest of slight wind. This courtyard’s lawn is bigger than students left it this morning. Cross a lake–no, puddle–and startle at an awoken sprinkler. Continue reading

Lessons from a stranded bus and late night microscope work

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Back in November, the week of Thanksgiving break (actually, the night before Thanksgiving day), I found myself stranded at 12:35am with fifty other people and steady rain in a parking lot in downtown Los Angeles. Usually, I fly back to the Bay Area from my school in San Diego– if I book my tickets sufficiently in advance, the costs are worth the visit back home; however, this time, I didn’t book my flight tickets early enough. Seat availability plummeted, prices skyrocketed, and I decided that taking the budget-friendly bus would be a good alternative.

I didn’t sleep more than an hour that night. We ended up left in that parking lot for reasons I’m to this day unsure of– the bus driver had stopped, told us all to vacate the bus because we were supposed to transfer, and promptly drove off as soon as the last person had removed their bag from the under-bus storage. Needless to say, there was no transfer.

We were in that parking lot for about an hour and a half until the company sent a replacement bus to pick us up. I tried to doze off again on this bus, but the frigid air blowing through the vents kept my mind active even though my body was craving rest. We made it to San Francisco by seven thirty in the morning, and I reached my home by eight. Continue reading

onward, 2018

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A couple days late on this tangible reflection, but that’s okay. New Year’s posts are some of my favorites to write just because they give me a great excuse to go down the nostalgia rabbit-hole that is this blog.

Following up on last year, here’s what I did and what I’ll do (+ some bonus 2018 pictures). Continue reading

Contemplating the inherent morality of novels

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One of my best friends hates reading.

“It’s not that I don’t appreciate a good analysis of a book,” he said, “I just feel like I don’t get anything out of reading the novels they forced on us in high school English class. Like, it makes me feel like it’s a waste, because just the fact that I had to read it on a certain timeline and do a certain thing with it ruined the book for me. I feel like that sucked out the chance to really get anything out of the book.”

At first, I was appalled.

Continue reading

On Science Education and Stinky Plants

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I waited in line for twenty minutes. At this point, the long string of people almost wrapped around the corner of the building. When I finally walk into the Conservatory of Flowers in San Francisco, a blast of humid air envelops me, closely followed by a musty, almost foul smell. I feel a grin stretching across my face as I trace the scent through a tropical plant oasis into the large gallery that holds the perpetrator.

A titan arum plant, popularly known as the “corpse flower” for its stench, awaits in its terra cotta planter home. A long, yellow protrusion–the spadix–rises from the center of an open, frilly base. The spathe, I remind myself, studying the maroon and green folds of the leaf structure before I tune in to a staff member talking to a mass of wide-eyed visitors.

Continue reading at Bagicha.com →

Time Travel: thoughts from my East Coast visit

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I stepped out of the airport to a blast of heat, inwardly grumbling at the prospect of quickly becoming drenched in sweat as I lugged my bags toward the car. However, as the week went on, I quickly found myself adjusting to the heavy, humid air as my cousin and I roamed the streets of DC and New York City.

Continue reading